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When does youth employment become child labor?

9m · The Indicator from Planet Money · 20 Mar 21:48

The number of teenagers in the workforce today is at its highest level in about 20 years. At the same time, child labor violations are up and states are relaxing some protections for their youngest workers. On today's show, we examine the state of the Gen Z labor force, and the distinction between youth employment and child labor.
Related episodes:
Young, 'spoiled and miserable' in China (Apple / Spotify)
Teenage (Employment) Wasteland
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The episode When does youth employment become child labor? from the podcast The Indicator from Planet Money has a duration of 9:05. It was first published 20 Mar 21:48. The cover art and the content belong to their respective owners.

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