The Indicator from Planet Money cover logo

Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines

9m · The Indicator from Planet Money · 10 Apr 22:34

Europe wants clean energy, but it's struggling to compete with the low cost of China's green technology. The E.U. just announced it's investigating the subsidies received by Chinese wind turbine suppliers, which play a part in those low costs.
On today's episode, we speak with Margrethe Vestager, the European Commissioner for Competition, about how the E.U. is trying to build and maintain a competitive green tech industry in the face of low-price Chinese imports. And we ask how the U.S.'s climate industrial policy fits into all this action.
Related Episodes:
The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify)
Industrial policy, the debate! (Apple / Spotify)
Why offshore wind is facing headwinds (Apple / Spotify)
For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org .

Music by
Drop Electric . Find us: TikTok , Instagram , Facebook , Newsletter .
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

The episode Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines from the podcast The Indicator from Planet Money has a duration of 9:27. It was first published 10 Apr 22:34. The cover art and the content belong to their respective owners.

More episodes from The Indicator from Planet Money

Trade wars and talent shortages

Indicators of the Week is back. This time, an in-depth look at what Biden's massive tariffs on Chinese imports might mean for inflation and jobs. After that, why it may soon become easier to become a certified public accountant, addressing that nagging CPA shortage.
Related Episodes:
If the world had no accountants (Apple / Spotify)
The surprising leader in EVs (Apple / Spotify)
How electric vehicles got their juice (Apple / Spotify)
For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org .

Music by
Drop Electric . Find us: TikTok , Instagram , Facebook , Newsletter .
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

How the Dominican Republic became Latin America's economic superstar

For decades, the Dominican Republic's economy has been growing at a remarkably steady pace. The Caribbean nation of 11 million people is today considered a middle-income nation, but the International Monetary Fund projects it could become an advanced economy within the next 40 years.
Today on the show, we uncover the reasons behind the Dominican Republic's economic success and whether or not these benefits are being felt widely in the country.
For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org .

Music by
Drop Electric . Find us: TikTok , Instagram , Facebook , Newsletter .
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

The highs and lows of US rents

The latest inflation numbers are in. This month's Consumer Price Index, or the CPI, is ... well, good and bad news for renters. Shelter prices went up over the last year, but at a slower pace. Shelter makes up nearly a third of the CPI. Today's episode: Rent. Where is it high? Where is it low? What exactly is "coffee milk"? The Indicator tours the U.S. to bring you the answers.
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

The "Winner Take All" problem

When June Carbone, Naomi Cahn and Nancy Levit set out to write a book about women in the workforce, they initially thought it would be a story all about women's march towards workplace equality. But when they looked at the data, they found something more disturbing: of the ways in which women's push toward workplace equality has actually been stalled for years.
In today's episode, law professor June Carbone argues that the root of the problem lies in something they call the "winner take all" approach to business. That's the thesis of their new book, "Fair Shake: Women & the Fight to Build a Just Economy".
Related episodes:
What would it take to fix retirement? (Apple / Spotify)
For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org .

Music by
Drop Electric . Find us: TikTok , Instagram , Facebook , Newsletter .
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

Is 'government crypto' a good idea?

Advancements in cryptocurrency networks are sparking conversations about the potential for Central Bank Digital Currencies, or CBDCs for short. Advocates for CBDCs think they would provide security and unlock more efficient fiscal policy actions. However, opponents believe they would provide a shortcut for government interference and the erosion of privacy.
Today on the show, we'll dive deep into the world of CBDCs and pose the question if countries actually need them at all.
For sponsor-free episodes of The Indicator from Planet Money, subscribe to Planet Money+ via Apple Podcasts or at plus.npr.org .

Music by
Drop Electric . Find us: TikTok , Instagram , Facebook , Newsletter .
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
NPR Privacy Policy

Every Podcast » The Indicator from Planet Money » Why the EU is investigating China's wind turbines