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Trump's Trials

by NPR

Reporting and analysis on the inquiries, trials, and criminal probes facing former President Donald Trump. From the Jan. 6 insurrection and Georgia election interference, to the ongoing question of classified documents - and beyond - host Scott Detrow, political editor Domenico Montanaro and legal experts dive deep every week to explore the news inside the courtrooms and the stakes for American democracy.
Support NPR's reporting by subscribing to Trump's Trials+ and unlock sponsor-free listening. Learn more at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials

Copyright: Copyright 2023 NPR - For Personal Use Only

Episodes

Judge's handling of classified documents case invites scrutiny from legal experts

15m · Published 06 Apr 07:00
This week on Trump's Trials , host Scott Detrow is joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson and NYU law professor Melissa Murray.
This week Judge Aileen Cannon dismissed one of former President Donald Trump's motions to dismiss the Florida classified documents case. Trump argued that when he left the White House he designated the highly sensitive documents as "personal" under the Presidential Records Act.
But Cannon has not prevented Trump from using that same argument as part of his defense — something Special Counsel Jack Smith pushed back against in a recent brief.
Topics include:
- Presidential Records Act
- Jury instructions
- Gag order in hush money case
- Civil fraud bond
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected]
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Threats against judges in Trump-related cases soar

6m · Published 02 Apr 20:19
For this episode of Trump's Trials , All Things Considered host Ari Shapiro speaks with Reuters reporter Ned Parker.
On Monday Judge Juan Merchan, who is overseeing the New York hush money case, expanded a gag order to protect his own family. That's after former President Donald Trump repeatedly attacked the judge's daughter on Truth Social. In his ruling Judge Merchan wrote, "the threat is very real."
This follows a recent report out from Reuters that found threats against federal judges, prosecutors, judicial staff and court buildings has tripled since 2015. Judges in federal Trump-related cases often receive death threats, credible enough to warrant protection from the U.S. Marshals Service.
Topics include:
- Increase in threats
- Connection to Trump
- Judges and U.S. Marshals' response
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
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Former Supreme Court Justice Breyer on the dangers of constitutional 'textualism'

14m · Published 30 Mar 07:00
This week on Trump's Trials , host Scott Detrow is joined by retired Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.
In Breyer's new book Reading the Constitution: Why I Chose Pragmatism, Not Textualism , Breyer explains why he finds textualism's popularity troublesome.
Textualism is the legal theory that argues the correct way to interpret the Constitution and statutes is to read the text as it was understood at the time the documents were written. Pragmatism, the legal theory Breyer favors, takes current social and political context into consideration when formulating a legal opinion.
In Breyer's view, textualism can weaken the public's faith in the rule of law and poses risks for the health of nation.
However, Breyer was reluctant to comment on cases pending before the court, like former President Donald Trump's claim he is immune from criminal prosecution because of presidential immunity.
Topics include:
- Pragmatism vs. textualism
- Public opinion of the court
- Trump and immunity
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
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NPR Politics Podcast: Trump's civil fraud judgement dropped to $175 million

14m · Published 27 Mar 20:27
For this episode of Trump's Trials , we hand the mic over to the NPR Politics Podcast
Former President Donald Trump got a brief reprieve in his New York civil case, as the amount he owes to secure a $454 million bond has been temporarily reduced on appeal.
In another New York courtroom the judge overseeing the criminal hush money case set a new trial date — April 15th. The case was originally set to go to trial on March 25th but was delayed due to prosecution and defense receiving new documents from the U.S. attorney's office.
NPR Politics Podcast host and White House correspondent Deepa Shivaram is joined by justice correspondent Carrie Johnson and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.
Topics include:
- Civil fraud judgment lowered
- Impact on Trump campaign
- Next steps
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
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Trial for Donald Trump's hush money case will begin on April 15

5m · Published 25 Mar 22:07
For this episode of Trump's Trials , host Scott Detrow speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein.
An appeals court has cut the bond former President Donald Trump has to post from $454 million to $175 million in his civil fraud trial. The news came the same day as the deadline before the New York Attorney General could start seizing Trump properties to pay off the massive judgement. And in a separate New York court, a judge sharply rebuked Trump's lawyers in his hush money criminal case and set a trial date for April 15.
Topics include:
- How Trump bargained his way to a lower bond
- Trump's response to the criminal case against him going forward
- Next steps
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
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Here's what you need to know about the New York hush money case

21m · Published 23 Mar 07:00
This week on Trump's Trials , host Scott Detrow and Domenico Montanaro are joined law professor Kim Wehle.
On the eve of what should have been the start of the New York hush money trial we dive into the details of the case:
Former President Donald Trump is facing 34 counts related to payments to adult film star Stormy Daniels over an alleged affair she had with Trump. The payments were made in the fall of 2016, just months before the election.
Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg is claiming those payments are a form of election interference, with the theory being by paying off Daniels, Trump prevented information about the alleged affair from reaching voters.
The case has been delayed to give the Trump team time to sort through hundreds of thousands of documents.
Meanwhile, Trump's $454 million civil fraud judement is due in less than 48 hours. His lawyers are claiming they are unable to come up with the bond to pay the judgment. We look into what could happen if Trump does not pay the state of New York.
Topics include:
- New York hush money case
- Southern District of New York documents
- Civil fraud judgement due
- What happens if Trump can't post the money
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected]
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Manhattan DA says Trump hush money trial can start in April

4m · Published 21 Mar 21:38
For this episode of Trump's Trials , NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein.
Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg says there's no reason former president Donald Trump's hush money criminal trial can't start next month. Last week Bragg agreed to delay the trial - originally scheduled to begin on March 25th - for 30 days due to an influx of documents from the U.S. Attorney's office. Trump's attorneys have been arguing for an even longer delay of 90 days.
Topics include:
- Reason for delay in documents being delivered
- Trump's response
- Next steps
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
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What happens if Trump can't pay his $454 million civil fraud penalty?

5m · Published 19 Mar 20:42
For this episode of Trump's Trials , NPR's Ailsa Chang speaks with NPR's Andrea Bernstein.
Former President Donald Trump is claiming he cannot secure a bond for roughly half a billion dollars to cover the judgment from his New York civil fraud trial. Lawyers for Trump claim they approached 30 companies and four brokers and none were willing to give Trump the $454 million bond. Trump has until March 25th to file the bond or risk having some of his assets seized.
Topics include:
- Bond deadline
- Possible appeal
- Possible asset seizer
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
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In Georgia a resignation, in New York a delay

14m · Published 15 Mar 22:20
This week on Trump's Trials , host Scott Detrow is joined by Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson and Georgia politics reporter Sam Gringlas.
Judge Scott McAfee ruled Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis can stay on the Georgia election interference case but only if she removes special prosecutor Nathan Wade. Wade later resigned in a letter to the district attorney.
Willis and Wade had come under fire for having a relationship that Trump and his co-defendants argued was a conflict of interest. Judge McAfee said in his ruling that the defendants did not meet the burden of proving the relationship was a conflict of interest but found "a significant appearance of impropriety" in the prosecution team.
And in New York, the judge overseeing the hush money case officially delayed the start of that trial to mid-April. Jury selection was originally set to begin on March 25.
Topics include:
- Nathan Wade resigns
- What decision means for the case and Willis
- Delay in New York hush money case
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected]
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Judge denies one of Trump's motions to dismiss classified documents case

6m · Published 14 Mar 23:34
For this episode of Trump's Trials , NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with correspondent Greg Allen.
Judge Aileen Cannon held a pre-trial hearing where Trump's defense team argued two motions to dismiss charges against the former president in the classified documents case. Judge Cannon quickly denied one of the motions but has yet to rule on the other. During the hearing she appeared skeptical of both arguments presented by the Trump team.
Topics include:
- Presidential Records Act
- Espionage Act
- Trump in attendance
Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.
Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.
Email the show at [email protected].
Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices
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Trump's Trials has 47 episodes in total of non- explicit content. Total playtime is 9:04:29. The language of the podcast is English. This podcast has been added on November 12th 2023. It might contain more episodes than the ones shown here. It was last updated on April 11th, 2024 09:41.

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